Which pedal should I get?

A reader’s question:

Last year (after several years of playing the guitar) I finally bought my first effect pedals: the Walrus Audio Slö, the Earthquaker Devices Westwood and the Ditto looper.
I mostly listen to minimal, indie and ambient and therefore, I would love to create such sounds myself. But unfortunately, I have not made up my mind about a specific sound. Continue reading “Which pedal should I get?”

Ibanez AD-80 vs. DOD Rubberneck

This is a comparison of the Ibanez AD-80 with the DOD Rubberneck.
I wanted to compare the analog classic (AD-80) that is pretty hard to find on the second hand market with a modern classic which is easily available.
By using the the sonic options of the Rubberneck (gain/tone), I tried to make them both sound as similiar as possible.

0:11 AD-80 maximum delay time/ Rubberneck tone at noon, gain fccw Continue reading “Ibanez AD-80 vs. DOD Rubberneck”

Which pedal should I get: Walrus Audio ARP 87 or DOD Rubberneck?

Recently, I received the following request:
I moved on from a DOD Rubberneck due to its size, and I am considering a Walrus Audio ARP 87. I would really like a full analog delay in small size, but the Chase Bliss Audio is way above my budget and I didn’t really like the JHS Panther Cub in relation to its price.
Is there any other delay you would recommend? I want something with tap tempo and a small footprint… Continue reading “Which pedal should I get: Walrus Audio ARP 87 or DOD Rubberneck?”

Maxon AD-900 vs. Ibanez AD-80

This is a comparison of the Maxon AD-900 with the Ibanez AD-80.
These two analog classics are about the same age and sonically they are pretty close to each other. If you ever get the chance, to get one of them on the second hand market, got for it. Here you can find out, which one, you should get.

0:12 AD-80 max delay time / AD-900 delay time adjusted to the AD-80 Continue reading “Maxon AD-900 vs. Ibanez AD-80”

Fulltone Tube Tape Echo vs. Echoboy VST

Because of the request of one of my followers, I made this comparison of the Fulltone Tube Tape Echo vs. Echoboy VST. Check out the sound of the classic compared to different settings of the digital VST.

0:13 TTE brighter and grittier setting vs. Echoboy echoplex setting Continue reading “Fulltone Tube Tape Echo vs. Echoboy VST”

Valhalla delay VST vs. analog delay pedals

This is a comparison of the the Valhalla delay VST with two analog delay pedals. For I wanted a darker delay sound without modulation and a brighter delay sound with modulation as a sonic reference, I choose the Maxon AD900 and Electro Harmonix Deluxe Memory Man for this comparison.

0:10 Maxon AD900 vs. Valhalla delay past era setting Continue reading “Valhalla delay VST vs. analog delay pedals”

My favorite budget delays

Because of the numerous requests regarding my favorite bugdet delays, I tried to figure out my top delays within the categories tape emulation, digital delay and analog delay.
The order of the delays within the respective group or video is not a ranking, for I am unable to tell which of them I like best.

0:04 NUX Tape Core Deluxe Continue reading “My favorite budget delays”

Double Delay Time Mod for the EHX Deluxe Memory Man

Tips & tricksThe modification to double the delay time of the EHX Deluxe Memory Man is pretty poular. But it is very hard to calibrate the pedal. You definitely need an oscilloscope. Here is an instruction Howard Davis published some years ago. Continue reading “Double Delay Time Mod for the EHX Deluxe Memory Man”

Strymon Brigadier vs. Electro Harmonix Deluxe Memory Man

This is a comparison of the Strymon Brigadier with the Electro Harmonix Deluxe Memory Man.
The Electro Harmonix Deluxe Memory Man is one of the brightest analog delays with a maximum delay time of up to 550ms.
Therefore, I choose the medium setting of the Brigadier, which emulates an analog delay with two ICs. Additionally, I turned the tone pot a bit further to create a similar bright sound.

0:11 Deluxe Memory Man medium delay time Continue reading “Strymon Brigadier vs. Electro Harmonix Deluxe Memory Man”

Analog ping pong delay Ping pong delay is a popular feature of many digital delays. But what about analog delays? Is there a way to stack two analog delays to create a ping pong effect? I would not be the delay specialist, if I would not have take interest in this issue. Ping pong delay A delay signal, alternatingly running through the left and the right channel is called ping pong delay. Mostly, the delay times are identically, but of course, it is possible to set varying times for rhythmical emphasizes like for example dotted 8th. Analog delay pedals In contrast to digital delay pedal, analog delays can not be programmed to create certain effects. That means, every single bucket brigade device repeats the adjusted delay time constantly. But to create a ping pong delay, the identical delay time has to be created alternatingly through two outputs. Maybe, it would become possible to produce a ping pong effect with an analog delay with a digital control, but so far, no manufacturer has started such an experiment. Two analog delays What about creating a ping pong effect by using two analog delays? For this, both pedals have to send the same delay time with alternating signals. And this is where it gets complicated. One option might be, to route both delays in a mixer that sends the signal via LFO to the according outputs. But actually, the LFO needs a synchronization with the delay time. By using a little mixer with aux channel, an analog ping pong delay becomes possible. In this case, it is important to mute the repeats of both delays. Now, you connect your guitar (or the instrument you like) to the input of the mixer. Next, you link the aux send with the input of the first delay. The wet output of this first delay needs to be splitted. On the one hand, you connect it with the input of the second delay, on the other hand, you establish a connection to one input of the mixer. The respective channel needs to be panned completely to the left. Then, you route the output of the second delay to the input of the other channel of the mixer and pan the signal completely to the right. The number of repeats can be adjusted via the aux control. By sending the signal from the mixer a second time to the delays, you create further repeats. To keep the signal completely analog, you ought to use an analog mixing console. By using a digital mixer, the delay would at least become an analog/digital hybrid. For this experiment, you could also add further effects to the two effect loops, like for example modulation or overdrive. Have fun in experimenting!

Tips & tricksPing pong delay is a popular feature of many digital delays.
But what about analog delays? Is there a way to stack two analog delays to create a ping pong effect?
I would not be the delay specialist, if I would not have take interest in this issue. Continue reading “Analog ping pong delay Ping pong delay is a popular feature of many digital delays. But what about analog delays? Is there a way to stack two analog delays to create a ping pong effect? I would not be the delay specialist, if I would not have take interest in this issue. Ping pong delay A delay signal, alternatingly running through the left and the right channel is called ping pong delay. Mostly, the delay times are identically, but of course, it is possible to set varying times for rhythmical emphasizes like for example dotted 8th. Analog delay pedals In contrast to digital delay pedal, analog delays can not be programmed to create certain effects. That means, every single bucket brigade device repeats the adjusted delay time constantly. But to create a ping pong delay, the identical delay time has to be created alternatingly through two outputs. Maybe, it would become possible to produce a ping pong effect with an analog delay with a digital control, but so far, no manufacturer has started such an experiment. Two analog delays What about creating a ping pong effect by using two analog delays? For this, both pedals have to send the same delay time with alternating signals. And this is where it gets complicated. One option might be, to route both delays in a mixer that sends the signal via LFO to the according outputs. But actually, the LFO needs a synchronization with the delay time. By using a little mixer with aux channel, an analog ping pong delay becomes possible. In this case, it is important to mute the repeats of both delays. Now, you connect your guitar (or the instrument you like) to the input of the mixer. Next, you link the aux send with the input of the first delay. The wet output of this first delay needs to be splitted. On the one hand, you connect it with the input of the second delay, on the other hand, you establish a connection to one input of the mixer. The respective channel needs to be panned completely to the left. Then, you route the output of the second delay to the input of the other channel of the mixer and pan the signal completely to the right. The number of repeats can be adjusted via the aux control. By sending the signal from the mixer a second time to the delays, you create further repeats. To keep the signal completely analog, you ought to use an analog mixing console. By using a digital mixer, the delay would at least become an analog/digital hybrid. For this experiment, you could also add further effects to the two effect loops, like for example modulation or overdrive. Have fun in experimenting!”

Strymon Brigadier vs. Ibanez AD9 and Boss DM-2

This is a comparison of the Ibanez AD9 and the Boss DM-2 with the Strymon Brigadier.
The Ibanez AD9 and the Boss DM-2 are two of the first analog delays. They provide a maximum delay time of about 300ms and a unique kind of oscillation.
For this comparison, choose the short setting for the Brigadier, because, it emulates an analog delay with one IC. Thereby, the Brigadier gets close to the sound of the AD9 and the DM-2.

0:11 Ibanez AD9 max delay time Continue reading “Strymon Brigadier vs. Ibanez AD9 and Boss DM-2”

Strymon Brigadier vs. DOD Rubberneck

This is a comparison of the Strymon Brigadier with the DOD Rubberneck.
I think, the DOD Rubberneck sets the standards regarding analog delay pedals. Therefore, I would like to find out if the Strymon Brigadier is able to emulate such analog sounds.
Besides the comparison of different settings, I also checked out how these two sound stacked.

1:06 dark Continue reading “Strymon Brigadier vs. DOD Rubberneck”

Deluxe Memory Man – how to find out whether the chips are 3005 or 3008

A reader’s question to the Dude:

“Hey there, I just bought a Deluxe Memory Man modded by AnalogMan, how can I tell whether the chips are 3005 or 3008?” Continue reading “Deluxe Memory Man – how to find out whether the chips are 3005 or 3008”

Seymour Duncan Vapor Trail

Seymour Duncan Vapor Trail The Seymour Duncan Vapor Trail is a pedalboard-friendly analog delay.
Initially, the mono pedal came around in a stylish silver-blue lacquering, while the more recent version attracts attention in an intensive blue. Continue reading “Seymour Duncan Vapor Trail”

My favorite analog delays (2020)

Because of the numerous requests regarding my favorite delays, I tried to figure out my top delays. In this second part, I present my favorite analog delays.
The order of the delays within the respective group or video is no ranking for I am unable to tell which of them I like best. Thus, the presentation is according to the alphabetical order of their names.

0:04 MXR Carbon Copy Deluxe Continue reading “My favorite analog delays (2020)”