A question regarding the wet output + volume poti mod for the EHX Freeze

A reader’s question:

I have got a question regarding the Wet Output + Volume Poti Mod and the Remote Switch Mod for the EHX Freeze.
Is the volume mod supposed to control the volume of the wet signal or the dry signal or the mix?
And will the function of the original switch of the Freeze remain after the installation of the output for the additional switch? In other words: Could the bass player in my band control the Freeze on my pedalboard from the other side of the stage while I am playing the WahWah? Continue reading “A question regarding the wet output + volume poti mod for the EHX Freeze”

Which pedal should I get?

A reader’s question:

Last year (after several years of playing the guitar) I finally bought my first effect pedals: the Walrus Audio Slö, the Earthquaker Devices Westwood and the Ditto looper.
I mostly listen to minimal, indie and ambient and therefore, I would love to create such sounds myself. But unfortunately, I have not made up my mind about a specific sound. Continue reading “Which pedal should I get?”

The DelayDude Midi Sync Cable: Now approved by The Pedal Guy!

NewsThe DelayDude Midi Sync cable has been created to synchronize the Digitech SDRUM with the DITTO X4.
Now, The Pedal Guy has checked the DelayDude Midi Sync cable and to him as well, “it works like a charm!”. Continue reading “The DelayDude Midi Sync Cable: Now approved by The Pedal Guy!”

Andy Timmons and the Strymon Timeline

A reader’s question to the Dude:

I am a big Andy Timmons fan and I know that Andy uses a Strymon Timeline as substitute for a dual EHX Deluxe Memory Man. Can you help me regarding the setting? Continue reading “Andy Timmons and the Strymon Timeline”

Which pedal should I get: Walrus Audio ARP 87 or DOD Rubberneck?

Recently, I received the following request:
I moved on from a DOD Rubberneck due to its size, and I am considering a Walrus Audio ARP 87. I would really like a full analog delay in small size, but the Chase Bliss Audio is way above my budget and I didn’t really like the JHS Panther Cub in relation to its price.
Is there any other delay you would recommend? I want something with tap tempo and a small footprint… Continue reading “Which pedal should I get: Walrus Audio ARP 87 or DOD Rubberneck?”

Strymon DIG

Strymon DIg The Strymon DIG is a pedalboard-friendly digital delay which is able to emulate the double-rack unit of the 1980s. Continue reading “Strymon DIG”

Strymon Timeline

Strymon Timeline The Strymon Timeline is definitively not pedalboard-friendly, but in exchange to its size, this digital delay has a lot to offer. Continue reading “Strymon Timeline”

Fender Silverface Princeton Reverb – the perfect bedroom/rehearsal amp

Fender Silverface Princeton Reverb Some time ago, 100 Watts amps have been really common, but at the moment, small tube amps are as popular as never before. And there are many reasons, why. Continue reading “Fender Silverface Princeton Reverb – the perfect bedroom/rehearsal amp”

Strymon El Capistan

Strymon El Capistan The Strymon El Capistan is a relatively pedalboard-friendly tape echo emulation.
Actually, it is THE tape echo emulation that sets the standards for all other tape echo emulations. Continue reading “Strymon El Capistan”

Analog ping pong delay Ping pong delay is a popular feature of many digital delays. But what about analog delays? Is there a way to stack two analog delays to create a ping pong effect? I would not be the delay specialist, if I would not have take interest in this issue. Ping pong delay A delay signal, alternatingly running through the left and the right channel is called ping pong delay. Mostly, the delay times are identically, but of course, it is possible to set varying times for rhythmical emphasizes like for example dotted 8th. Analog delay pedals In contrast to digital delay pedal, analog delays can not be programmed to create certain effects. That means, every single bucket brigade device repeats the adjusted delay time constantly. But to create a ping pong delay, the identical delay time has to be created alternatingly through two outputs. Maybe, it would become possible to produce a ping pong effect with an analog delay with a digital control, but so far, no manufacturer has started such an experiment. Two analog delays What about creating a ping pong effect by using two analog delays? For this, both pedals have to send the same delay time with alternating signals. And this is where it gets complicated. One option might be, to route both delays in a mixer that sends the signal via LFO to the according outputs. But actually, the LFO needs a synchronization with the delay time. By using a little mixer with aux channel, an analog ping pong delay becomes possible. In this case, it is important to mute the repeats of both delays. Now, you connect your guitar (or the instrument you like) to the input of the mixer. Next, you link the aux send with the input of the first delay. The wet output of this first delay needs to be splitted. On the one hand, you connect it with the input of the second delay, on the other hand, you establish a connection to one input of the mixer. The respective channel needs to be panned completely to the left. Then, you route the output of the second delay to the input of the other channel of the mixer and pan the signal completely to the right. The number of repeats can be adjusted via the aux control. By sending the signal from the mixer a second time to the delays, you create further repeats. To keep the signal completely analog, you ought to use an analog mixing console. By using a digital mixer, the delay would at least become an analog/digital hybrid. For this experiment, you could also add further effects to the two effect loops, like for example modulation or overdrive. Have fun in experimenting!

Tips & tricksPing pong delay is a popular feature of many digital delays.
But what about analog delays? Is there a way to stack two analog delays to create a ping pong effect?
I would not be the delay specialist, if I would not have take interest in this issue. Continue reading “Analog ping pong delay Ping pong delay is a popular feature of many digital delays. But what about analog delays? Is there a way to stack two analog delays to create a ping pong effect? I would not be the delay specialist, if I would not have take interest in this issue. Ping pong delay A delay signal, alternatingly running through the left and the right channel is called ping pong delay. Mostly, the delay times are identically, but of course, it is possible to set varying times for rhythmical emphasizes like for example dotted 8th. Analog delay pedals In contrast to digital delay pedal, analog delays can not be programmed to create certain effects. That means, every single bucket brigade device repeats the adjusted delay time constantly. But to create a ping pong delay, the identical delay time has to be created alternatingly through two outputs. Maybe, it would become possible to produce a ping pong effect with an analog delay with a digital control, but so far, no manufacturer has started such an experiment. Two analog delays What about creating a ping pong effect by using two analog delays? For this, both pedals have to send the same delay time with alternating signals. And this is where it gets complicated. One option might be, to route both delays in a mixer that sends the signal via LFO to the according outputs. But actually, the LFO needs a synchronization with the delay time. By using a little mixer with aux channel, an analog ping pong delay becomes possible. In this case, it is important to mute the repeats of both delays. Now, you connect your guitar (or the instrument you like) to the input of the mixer. Next, you link the aux send with the input of the first delay. The wet output of this first delay needs to be splitted. On the one hand, you connect it with the input of the second delay, on the other hand, you establish a connection to one input of the mixer. The respective channel needs to be panned completely to the left. Then, you route the output of the second delay to the input of the other channel of the mixer and pan the signal completely to the right. The number of repeats can be adjusted via the aux control. By sending the signal from the mixer a second time to the delays, you create further repeats. To keep the signal completely analog, you ought to use an analog mixing console. By using a digital mixer, the delay would at least become an analog/digital hybrid. For this experiment, you could also add further effects to the two effect loops, like for example modulation or overdrive. Have fun in experimenting!”

Review: Strymon Brigadier Part 2

The first part of the  of the Strymon Brigadier-review was about the features of this digital delay pedal. This second part is dedicated to the sound of the Strymon Brigadier.

Sound

Th short mode, which is oriented to a one-chip delay, offers a beautiful slapback sound with at least up to 400ms. Maxed, the delay sound becomes somehow metallic – similar to an analog delay with an overclocked chip.
The peak of the repeats is very realistic at the upper mids and cut very well through the mix. Continue reading “Review: Strymon Brigadier Part 2”

Review: Strymon Brigadier Part 1

Strymon BrigadierThis is the first part of a detailed review about theStrymon Brigadier, a dbucket delay which emulates an analog delay is dedicated to the features of this digital delay pedal.
The Brigadier comes around in a compact, green aluminum enclosure that is similar to the ones we know from the El Capistan, the DIG or the Flint. While these three are absolutely legendary, the Brigadier seems to be overlooked in a certain way. With justification? Continue reading “Review: Strymon Brigadier Part 1”

Seymour Duncan Vapor Trail

Seymour Duncan Vapor Trail The Seymour Duncan Vapor Trail is a pedalboard-friendly analog delay.
Initially, the mono pedal came around in a stylish silver-blue lacquering, while the more recent version attracts attention in an intensive blue. Continue reading “Seymour Duncan Vapor Trail”

Meine liebsten Digital Delays

Oft werde ich gefragt, welche meine Favoriten unter den Delays sind und ich muss gestehen, dass ich mich mit der Beantwortung dieser Frage wahnsinnig schwertue.
Trotzdem bin ich mal in mich gegangen und habe in den Kategorien analog Delays, digital Delays und Tape Emulationen jeweils eine Top-Gruppe zusammengestellt.
Innerhalb der Gruppen gilt, dass die Nennung der einzelnen Delays, beziehungsweise ihre Reihenfolge in den Videos nichts darüber aussagt, welches von ihnen ich am besten finde.
Ich könnte kein klares Ranking in den Gruppen vornehmen, weil ich mich zwischen den jeweils vorgestellten Delays mit ihren Vorzügen und „Nachteilen“ (wenn man meine Kritikpunkte überhaupt als solche bezeichnen kann) nicht entscheiden könnte. Daher erfolgt ihre Nennung in alphabetischer Reihenfolge.
In diesem letzten Teil der Serie geht es um meine liebsten digital Delays.

0:03 Boss DD-200 Continue reading “Meine liebsten Digital Delays”

My favorite digital delay pedals

Many times, I have been asked about my favorite delay pedals and I must confess, that this question is soo hard to answer to.
Nevertheless, after a long time of thinking and trying, I figured out groups of my favorite delays regarding the categories analog delays, digital delays and tape emulations.
The order of the delays within the respective group or video is no ranking for I am unable to tell which of them I like best. Thus, the presentation is according to the alphabetical order of their names.
This last part is dedicated to my favorite digital delay pedals. Continue reading “My favorite digital delay pedals”