Reverse delay trouble

A readers question to the DelayDude:

For a new song, I used a chord sequence recorded with a reverse delay. I think, in my own case this is an appropriate substitute for an extensive synth sound.
But I recognized that it is pretty hard to control the reverse delay and now, I am not able to reproduce my record exactly. I have the feeling that it does whatever it wants to do. Somehow, the rhythm of the reverse signal varies each time.
I am not sure, if this is problem only occurs in my setup but I tried my best to describe the trouble.
At the moment I am using the reverse delay of the Boss ME-80, might this be the source of error? Continue reading “Reverse delay trouble”

Andy Timmons and the Strymon Timeline

A reader’s question to the Dude:

I am a big Andy Timmons fan and I know that Andy uses a Strymon Timeline as substitute for a dual EHX Deluxe Memory Man. Can you help me regarding the setting? Continue reading “Andy Timmons and the Strymon Timeline”

Is there a more robust pedal that sounds like the Ibanez EM5 Echomachine?

Ask the DudeThere are so many great delays, that have been discontinued. The Ibanez EM5 is one of them.
It is not yet known, why the production has been stopped. Continue reading “Is there a more robust pedal that sounds like the Ibanez EM5 Echomachine?”

Korg Volca – unoffical firmware

Tips & tricksThe Korg Volcas are pretty flexible devices that received a little firmware-update last year.
But there are also unofficial firmware versions for the Volca FM and the Volca Sample, which I have tested as well.

Installation

Similar to the installation of the official updates, the update mode must be activated while the Korg Volca is started. Therefore, you have to keep the buttons Func and Play pressed while you switch the Volca on. Now, you can connect the sync-in jack of the Volca with the audio-out of the computer.
The volume of the computer ought to be quite loud, but not maxed. I mostly use a level of 80%.
By using an adequate media plays, the firmware can be played back as an audio file via the computer. In this case, it is important to deactivate all further sounds (like emailbox or likewise). Otherwise, you will get an error message.
After the update is finished, the Volca needs a re-start.

Volca FM 1.09

For the velocity function is a decisive characteristic of inspiring FM sounds, a FM synth actually is supposed to provide such a feature.
Unfortunately, Korg has not implemented this feature by now.
Alternatively, you could complement this function for external keyboards via using a specific Retrokits RK-002 midi cable.
The unofficial Firmware 1.09 add the velocity function to the Volca. The keys of the internal keyboard do not send velocity information, but by connecting an external keyboard, the respective data can be sent to the FM.

Another interesting feature is the patch changes note on/off. While it is deactivated, a played tone can be sustained, even though you select another sound. Until now, the sound has been stopped in this case. Now, a fluent transition between different sounds is possible.

Besides, there have been new control change orders added. For example, the free assignment of the mod wheel, various chorus settings, the loading of patches and pattern as well as subdivisions of the tempo.

The firmware runs quite reliably. Only some posts on the internet revolve around the problem, that the Volca switches itself of with this firmware. The reason is a flat battery or the power supply does not provide enough current. The FM needs more than 100mA to work reliable. The unofficial firmware might need a little more current; thus, you should keep the capacity of your power supply in mind.

All of these new features can be deactivated in the global menu. Ant those, who don’t like the firmware anyway, can downgrade the Volca to the official firmware easily. The Korg Volca support website offers a free download of this file.

Volca Sample Beta 7

Regarding the Volca Sample, the process of the installation of the Beta 7 firmware update is identical. You can replay all samples chromatically as well as using the “sequencer channel” to select all of the 10 sounds via the midi keyboard. As with the Volca FM, you can also activate velocity.
It can be selected just like pitch and note triggering via part or pattern.

New control changes for reverb, mutes, pattern-changes, reverse and so on have been implemented. Besides, there are also to new reverb algorithms.
Many of these new parameters can be changed directly in the live mode. It is not necessary to enter the global setup and re-start the device. By keeping the func button pressed, you can select a respective function through the sample pot.

Another interesting feature is the SAMP. It assigns 100 samples to the midi keyboard. Thereby, you can use all samples at the same time or rather program them via midi.
Thus, the Sample becomes a fully adequate sampler.
Of course, you can play polyphonic samples as well. Similar to the Digitakt, you can adjust the probabilities of a trigger. The standard setting is set to 100%. By reducing the probability, each pattern becomes a diversified part of the song.

Last but not least, there is the drone mode. It allows to set the decay of all samples to the maximum and thereby enables you to create some kind of infinite mode while you are looping.
This unofficial Beta 7 firmware runs stable and reliable. Because of the numerous features, I really recommend this type of firmware.
And it also applies in this case: if you don’t like the new firmware, you can go back too the official Korg firmware easily and for free.

Korg Kaosspad3 loops and the Elektron Digitakt midi sync

This is a video about how to use the Elektron Digitakt to midi sync start and stop loops of the Korg Kaoss Pad3 (KP3).

Gear:Elektron Digitakt, Korg Kaosspad3, Digitech SDRUM, DelayDude Midi Sync Cable

I show step by step how to record several loops on the Kaoss Pad3. The Digitakt starts the first loop of the KP3 via midi note #36, the second via midi note #37 and the third loop via midi note #38. Continue reading “Korg Kaosspad3 loops and the Elektron Digitakt midi sync”

Electro Harmonix Memory Man with Hazarai

memory man hazaraiThe Electro Harmonix Memory Man with Hazarai is much more than a delay pedal.
The rather less pedalboard friendly digital delay provides up to 3 seconds of maximum delay time. Continue reading “Electro Harmonix Memory Man with Hazarai”

Electro Harmonix Deluxe Memory Man 1100-TT

electro-harmonix-deluxe-memory-man-1100-ttAs we know the Electro Harmonix pedals, the Deluxe Memory Man 1100-TT also needs a lot of space on the pedalboard. But it is worth it. Continue reading “Electro Harmonix Deluxe Memory Man 1100-TT”

Ask the Dude: Lexicon vs. Neunaber and Moog vs. Strymon

Ask the DudeRecently, a YouTube subscriber directed the following questions concerning different reverb and delay effects to me and I thought, that the answers might be interesting for other guitarists too. Continue reading “Ask the Dude: Lexicon vs. Neunaber and Moog vs. Strymon”

Gamechanger Audio Plus Pedal vs. Electro Harmonix Superego

This is a comparison of the Gamechanger Audio Plus Pedal with the Electro Harmonix Superego.
In the first part you will hear the wet signal only.
The last part offers sounds ot the respective special modes of both pedals (layers mode of the Plus Pedal/ Gliss effect of the Superego).

gear: Fender Telecaster, Fender Tweed Champ, Celestion G12M, Shure SM57, Cubase.

+++ NAMM 2019 News Part 2+++

NewsBefore the NAMM 2019 opens the doors for guitar geeks from all over the world, the first information about new pedals, amps and instruments are announced. Here I would like to present the second selection of interesting news: Continue reading “+++ NAMM 2019 News Part 2+++”

The perfect delay pedal – Part 2

Ask the DudeIn the first part of “The perfect delay pedal” I declared myself to be an analog delay fan and expressed myself for tap tempo and midi input.

This second part will be about more features, a perfect delay should – in my opinion – provide. Continue reading “The perfect delay pedal – Part 2”

Pedalboards

PedalboardTo every guitarist, who use more than three effect pedals, it makes sense to think about how to transport and store the pedals in a rational way.
The need for a re-arrangement of the pedals before each gig or rehearsal is, on the one hand, pretty time consuming and, on the other hand, the permanent movement may cause a serious damage of cables or jacks.
But which pedalboard is the right one? Continue reading “Pedalboards”

Montreal Assembly Count to Five vs. Eventide H9 Harmonizer

This is a comparison of the Montreal Assembly Count to Five with the Eventide H9 Harmonizer.

gear: Fender Jaguar, Fender Tweed Champ, Celestion G12M, Shure SM57, Cubase.

 

The Montreal Assembly – Count to Five CT5 Demo

This is a demo of the Montreal Assembly – Count to Five.

I already told you about the Montreal Assembly Count to Five.
There are numerous descriptions circulating on the internet about this pedal and to many guitarists it seems pretty hard to get a picture of the various functions. Continue reading “The Montreal Assembly – Count to Five CT5 Demo”